fbpx

Hybrid Engines for Beginners

July 15, 2016

There has been a great hype around hybrid vehicles and how they are better for the environment as compared to their counterpart gas engines. Regardless of your interest in the automobile industry, you might know that hybrid engines are surely a friend for our environment. But do you know exactly how these engines pull off their remarkable feat? Do you know how these engines work? To help you understand it better, let’s unveil the science behind hybrid engines.

For starters, you should know about the two major types of hybrid engines that are used in different automobiles—parallel hybrids and series-parallel hybrids.

Parallel Hybrids

Most of the hybrids that you find on the road today, pack a parallel hybrid engine. The reason why is that they tend to be the least costly and also the simplest. In parallel hybrids, the engine does not do much work. It is mainly left to propel the vehicle. The major work here is done by the electric motor.

Series-Parallel Hybrids

Consider this engine as a blend of series and parallel hybrids. Basically, what happens is that the electric motor and the engine take separate paths to propel the transmission. This allows for independent propulsion. Furthermore, this electric motor has the option to assist the engine or charge the battery using the regenerative braking.

What do they do?

Unlike popular belief, there is not a vast difference between the way a gasoline and a hybrid engine work. Just like the former, a hybrid also makes use of an internal combustion engine. This can also be fueled. The difference comes with the additional electric motor. These types of hybrid engines can be powered by electricity, either completely or partially.

The best case scenario is for a hybrid to use both the gas engine and the electric motor simultaneously to result in the most efficient performance. This not only lessens the damage to the environment but also puts less of a burden on your pocket.

The Power Split

Most of what the hybrid does is because of this device inserted into its engine called the power split device. This device allows both the gas engine and the electric motor to power the car independently. The enticing fact is that these engines can also act as a continuously variable transmission in addition to the manual and automatic modes.

As you put your foot down on the throttle, the car is initially powered by an electric motor. The batteries also assist this motor in providing the required power. There is a ring gear situated inside the power split device that begins spinning as the motor does. This ring gear forces the generator to spin as well, which continues to do so in order to let the main engine remain off, that is up till a certain speed is reached. This is when the gas engine takes it up, and your hybrid switches from electric to gas.

 

Want a replacement engine for your car? EngineWorld can get one for you! We have a wide range of USDM compatible top-quality used engines. For more information, dial (800) 903-4430.

 

Sources

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/hybrid-car7.htm

http://www.ucsusa.org/clean-vehicles/electric-vehicles/how-do-hybrids-work#.WOTS4NKGPcs

https://www.edmunds.com/fuel-economy/what-is-a-hybrid-car-how-do-hybrids-work.html

Related posts

high quality engine

Common Mistakes Drivers Make When Buying A New Engine

Your car’s engine is one of the most important parts of your vehicle. Unfortunately, many drivers have common misconceptions about what to look for in a new or used engine. This often leads to mistakes that can be costly later on. But how can you be sure you’re not making a mistake when you’re investing […]

Top 3 Ranked Japanese Engines

In 2016, the top three goods that were imported were: vehicles, machinery, electrical machinery. The reasons why America bought $50 billion worth of automobiles from Japan in 2016 is because of the vehicles’ reliability and high-quality engines. If you are looking to buy Japanese engines, low mileage Japanese engines, used Japanese transmissions, or used Toyota […]

Japanese engines

Overheating Engines Part One: 3 Common Causes

There is no shortage of vehicles on today’s roads. This is especially true with a PwC forecast showing about 107 million vehicles will be manufactured globally in 2020 alone. And if you’re an owner of one of these vehicles, it’s important to be prepared for something to go wrong. After all, vehicles aren’t indestructible. In […]

CONTACT US